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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
the policy environment the so conducive to dealing with the key issues between the u.s. and mexico. the immigration bill is hot and heavy, front and center. marco rubio did ginsburg in espagnole. he had five sunday shows, to talk about immigration. the gang of eight is hard at work on that. guns, u.s.-mexico relations. outink the guns may come not quite as favorable to mexico's longstanding positions as the immigration debate might. i would take a 14 two. we will be in good shape. the third is trade. mexico, the united states, now japan, canada, are linked in the trans-pacific partnership talks. talks with many of our key trading allies across the pacific. many of us view it as a chance to help bring nafta into the 21st century. the three are very much on the u.s. agenda. it shows great forward progress. welcome all of you to what promises to be a truly fascinating session. be second reason this will terrific is because of our panelists. i will say little bit more about the ambassador of mexico. doris meissner, who i served with in the clinton administration. she is one of our grea
was to reach out to the three services and say, in an environment of a constricting budget, why do you nt to spend some much money on this? i reached out to the pentagon office that is managing the program to understand what they were doing to fix this program. and then to people outside the military to get their perspective. >> how cooperative was lockheed martin? >> they were pretty cooperative. they made some of their executives available to me for interviews. they got me to sit in a flight simulator. just across the river in crystal city, virginia, not more than a 10-minute car ride from capitol hill, as part of their flight simulator center, it is a place where members of congress and their staff members and other government officials can go. it is a chance to show off the virtues of the airplane to the washington crowd. i did travel down to an air force base in florida to see the plane in action. on the florida panhandle in pensacola. >> is there a prison down there? >> good question. some watergate figures are in a prison down there. >> i tried to stay away from prison. >> sunday,
for a few hours and to institute special targeting rules both in the air environment and at the canadian border environment in case there were those seeking to escape the scene. with respect to fema, i can, when saw the response in boston and a coordinated it was, even given the level of destruction, i would remind the committee that just last november, boston held a massive exercise on how to deal with a mass casualty event. and that exercise was the kind of exercise and exercise is supported by the committee through fema to local areas, and again increasing our ability for response and resilience. we have worked with the fbi and ietotate lct ross e critical infrarurs d oprators, and we've been reaching out to faith-based organizations, community organizations and others who want to know what they can do. we are implementing a number of security measures, both seen and unseen at airports, transit hubs within the maritime environment, and at ports of entry. the coast guard is provided security on the ferries in the boston area. viper teams are doing searches on terms of ground transporta
just picked up from the environment of the blast, these are things that were packed into the bomb. >> i think we are still getting details of all the events that happened, and obviously it's very difficult to conclude, based on initial impressions. i won't exclude completely the possibility that some of the fragments are environmental, but my opinion is that most of them were in the bombs. >> reporter: most of the injuries were to the lower portions of the body. a possible indication of a more sophisticated, directed blast. now of the 31 people who were brought here 12 still remain. six to eight are under anesthesia at this moment. there were four amputations performed here and the doctors say for the most part these were automatic amputations, that the limbs had endured so much trauma the way one doctor described it, they just finished what the bomb had done, jon. jon: so for those who are still hospitalized how is it looking? >> reporter: the doctors won't make any promises, but they said it's looking pretty good. there are some limbs that are still at risk of amputation. also you had
of the larger faith community. >> the political environment is a lot different than in 2007 the last time congress took up an effort to overhaul the nation's immigration laws. right now we have evangelical leaders who have signed on and said, look, there's a religious imperative to embrace the stranger and to reach out and help people who are in our community. on the republican side, you have what they call a coalition of bibles, badges and business. you have faith leaders. you also have law enforcement leaders, attorney general from the states. and other sheriffs. and business leaders who are saying, look, our system is broken. its time to fix the system. on the republican side they're getting pressure from some of these core constituents to come up with a solution. >> ifill: is it fair to say after seeing his kind of tour de force on the sunday talk shows yesterday that senator marco rubio, the florida republican, is the face of this? or are there other... is there other agitation going on especially over in the house? >> marco rubio is seen as essential to presenting this bill to conse
community. >> the political environment is a lot different than in 2007 the last time congress took up an effort to overhaul the nation's immigration laws. right now we have evangelical leaders who have signed on and said, look, there's a religious imperative to embrace the stranger and to reach out and help people who are in our community. on the republican side, you have what they call a coalition of bles, badg and business. you have faith leaders. you also have law enforcement leaders, attorney general from the states. and other sheriffs. and business leaders who are saying, look, our system is broken. its time to fix the system. on the republican side they're getting pressure from some of these core constituents to come up with a solution. >> ifill: is it fair to say after seeing his kind of tour de force on the sunday talk shows yesterday that senator marco rubio, the florida republican, is the face of this? or are there other... is there other agitation going on especially over in the hou? >> rco rubiis see as essential to presenting this bill to conservative members of the repub
. >> the political environment is a lot different than in 2007 the last time congress took up an effort to overhaul the nation's immigration laws. right now we have evangelical leaders who have signed on and said, look, there's a religious imperative to embrace the stranger and to reach out and help people who are in our community. on the republican side, you have what ey call a coalitionf bibles, badges and business. you have faith leaders. you also have law enforcement leaders, attorney general from the states. and other sheriffs. and business leaders who are saying, look, our system is broken. its time to fix the system. on the republican side they're getting pressure from some of these core constituents to come up with a solution. >> ifill: is it fair to say after seeing his kind of tour de force on the sunday talk shows yesterday that senator marco rubio, the florida republican, is the face of this? or are there other... is there other agitation going on especially over in the hou? >> marco rubio is seen as essential to presenting this bill to conservative members of the republican caucus. bec
had -- they may not have had ieds but certainly have had high stress environments that kind of mimic a conflict. i'm thinking here about parts of the inner city or what is known as the inner city, cities like -- places like compton detroit, chicago a couple of years has been off the charts, parts of d.c. back in the '80s, parts of new york. so i mean -- i think there are high stress environments that mimic conflict zones. however, again i think this was different because this was -- we ignore what happens within our inner cities, within our urban centers and then in a way we ignore what happens in other people's cities and other people's foreign centers where we are active. and i think this was one moment that was broadcast all over -- all across the nation. it was all across the world. people were watching. all of a sudden, middle class americans, people who live in places like watertown they get a taste of what other countries -- what other people, what other parts of their own country have to go through. i don't think that it's crazy to -- the vocabulary that was used was the same
work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national zoo, he was so successful turning around a faltering institution that after he left they named a lion in his honor. john indeed was a lion, a lion on behalf of the federal employees, a lion on behalf of good government, a lion on behalf of integrity. john know he is a true leader and manager and an incredibly wa
and the reason is because the environment had so radically changed in a very short period of time. that's one of the things i detail. >> when we look at hawaii now we don't see that. we see the plantations and that sort of thing. so, t.d.? >> what i found out when i was researching this book is the paradise like other things is an intellectual and social construct and just as there is a paper trail in the spanish illusion that gold was to be found in florida, by the way i just want to clarify one thing it begins with the first massacre of white men in the western hemisphere certainly and north america and this is how our history began with a spanish learned there was nothing to be found. it was only tradition in florida, that was before they found out that they had established a settlement in jacksonville so they tore across the atlantic and massacred several hundred frenchmen and that is the beginning of the history. as i say in the beginning if we look at -- for this old guy looking for viagra and largely america thinks here comes a hurricane this is no understanding, but if you look at the
, constructing support mounts for objects, doing additional cleaning in a dry, stable environment. b. altman goal is to put these into the gallery and be able to share as much of the story of how these pumps operated, how they were made, what you're used for, their historical accounts from the sinking. we know that up to last when water put out the oilers, the pumps stopped moving. those are the things to consider is when dupont got here, the valve was still in position at its last moment. the think of the crew of monitor and the things they experienced and the struggles that they undertook to preserve c it ison and how ironi that today 100 petite years later they are still serving the nation in ways they could never have imagined, helping us understand marine conservation, understanding our past, and helping us look forward and learned from the lessons of the past. >> this weekend, looking at the history and literary lights for virginia beach, virginia, including more from the mariners' museum, saturday and noon eastern on c-span2. and sunday at 5:00 on american on c-span3. >> washington journal
and my being chair of the democratic party and protection of the environment, civil rights women's rights, gay rights economic justice, social justice, central america, anti-quandra, you name it. casey kason was there. i marched alongside of him in so many rallies, i can't tell you. he was a wonderful, wonderful guy. he is best known for top 40. once in a while, he moot lose his temper as he did when he was once asked to give a dedication to a little boy who lost -- whose dog had died and then he had to suddenly go from that into some up-beat song, and casey wasn't happy with what his producers had done to him. here he is. >> dear casey, this may seem to be a strange dedication request, but i am quite sincere, and it will mean a lot if you play it. recently, there was a death in our family. he was a little dog named snuggles but he was most certainly -- going to start again. i am coming out of the record. play the record please. >> not happy when you come out of those up-tempo numbers, it's impossible to make those transactions and go into somebody
create if they're released into the environment where they don't have any natural enemies. in seven weeks each female can produce 1200 eggs a year. yikes. will emerge from the ground after florida's rainy season ends. [ screaming ] >> import a bunch of frenchmen. >> stephanie: buy more butter. don't be left unprepared. >> they have python problem in florida and now they have sinkholes and now -- snails the size of buicks. >> stephanie: that sounds awful. >> and your hair would frizz. >> stephanie: not since that appearance for a miami station in august. my '80s hair again. [ explosion ] pay for a blowout straightening and i ironed it. like a minute and a half and. [ explosion ] i'm linked to mob squad again. >> no beauty or vanity in florida in august. >> stephanie: sweating! oh god. i would dry myself with a giant snail. sweating, that's all it is. all right. we were talking about -- oh, we still haven't gotten over the right wing caller even yesterday oh how come you aren't blaming obama? everyone blamed bush the same day 9-11 happened. [ buzzer ] which is complete crap. really bad anal
to make sure it fosters an environment where we can have small, medium and large banks, where we can have community banks that thrive, regional banks that tlooip thrive and large global banks. incidentally, andrew, if you look at the largest 50 banks, only about a half dozen are u.s. banks and incidentally, of the top 20 or 25 banks, our largest is number ten. so in terms of the size of our banks vis-a-vis our overall economy, much smaller than our international fears. >> but what about the idea that it's not just the banks. it's the financial companies, the insurance companies -- >> in addition to banks, we do have insurance companies in the financial services forum. >> there have been a lot of questions raised about all the regulations that were dropped on the banks when some of these other companies, like aig, for example, they were a huge problem and they're not going to be regulated in quite the same way. there's talk about cracking down on the insurer, as well. >> in the case of the nonbank, the group that was created under dodd-frank, the fsoc, is looking to designate a number of t
, but in this environment, the one thing i would ask for is more latitude in how we take the cut to fit the money with the most important payoff is. with respect to the question you raised, it is an age-old one and intelligence. the approach or try to take in the last two years is try to protect and invest in capabilities that give us the most general coverage. that's why a very strong on sustaining our overhead reconnaissance capability because it covers the earth, denied area or not and similarly, even when times are then, human capability is extremely important. that's when the hu what dr. vickers are io brilliae as much as it is a reshaping, recastg he organization i started in 1992 caughhet t defense humanrvice. better integration with the fbi and the cia. more clandestine case officer's who are worth their weight in gold. the unique capability no one else can render. as they make reductions, we have to focus much much more on quality, quality of investment since are not going to have in numbers. >> one quick question that's come up a number of times. and there is clear evidence, public evid
carbon pollution in the environment than we have in nearly 20 years, but we understand this is not enough. we've got to do better, and that's why we've got to pursue an all of the above numbering strategy that includes investing in more biofuels and more fuel efficient vehicles and more solar and wind power and more people going back to work building cars and homes and businesses that are more energy efficient than the ones we've got right now. that's why i've proposed new job-creating investments in science and innovation. and all these young people, as young as they are, they're all going to be going to college, and a lot of them are going to want to continue to pursue tear research and pursue their dreams. and if there is not the research grant pipeline in place, many of them will not have the resources to invent and discover the things that will make us healthier and make us more energy efficient and improve the quality of our lives. so this is not the time to gut investments that keep our businesses on the cutting edge. that keep our economy humming, that improving, you know, the qua
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)